The Aegean’s nameless dead


.

 


hashtag safe passage logoHello 🙄
I have written before about this, oh that was so long ago
, in 2006. Since then I kept as quiet as I could about the fact, I tried to amuse impressions, I clowned, I ignored questions. I can’t do that any more! The word has been said, the evidence is present and the report has been written: We don’t welcome refugees in Ikaria because refugees do not come to our shores alive. This is the devastating truth, the truth that I couldn’t afford to speak out openly about in 2006. I am sorry, readers. I am out of breath. Go on and read John Psaropoulos’ article in the IRIN. Please don’t add comments under this entry. I don’t want comments because no comments are needed. The only thing needed is action and loud protest!
😐
The Aegean’s nameless dead
.
IRIN: 'The Aegean’s nameless dead' by John Psaropoulos IRIN contributorThe girl was lying across the beach, her face down in the pebbles,” says municipal plumber Pantelis Markakis as we walk to the water’s edge. “What shocked me was when I saw that her hands were turned like this and white like stone,” he says, turning his palms upwards and gnarling his fingers. “I asked a coastguard officer if she was wearing gloves.

 

Girl refugee slipper in the coast of Ikaria: The beach at Iero is littered with refugees' possessions

«The unidentified 10- or 11-year-old was one of two bodies that washed up on the Greek island of Ikaria in the eastern Aegean on 19 December. The other was that of a man in his 20s.
Subsequent storms have since reclaimed the dozen-odd life jackets that washed up on the beach at Iero that day; but it is still littered with packets of Amoxipen, Spandoverin and Diclopinda – antibiotics, painkillers and anti-nausea medicine that were among the refugees’ possessions. Turkish fruit juice boxes also litter the shore along with a pair of hotel slippers from the Istanbul Holiday Inn, encrusted with barbed seed pods.»

Ikaria's rocky, jagged coastline is full of coves where bodies, or parts of bodies, can become lodged, impossible to see or recover

«Ikaria, and the sea around it, are named after the mythical hero, Ikaros, who plummeted to a watery grave after flying too close to the sun. He and his father, Daidalos, had constructed wings out of birds’ feathers held together by wax – a flimsiness born of desperation not unlike that of today’s refugees, who attempt to cross the Aegean in unseaworthy vessels wearing useless life vests.
The island sits at a relatively isolated longitude exposed to the north winds that sweep down from the Dardanelles to Crete. This means that it acts as a net for the bodies and wreckage of shipwrecked refugees and migrants that shoot past the islands of Samos and Chios to the north and east. For migrants to find themselves on Ikaria means that they have lost their way, and they rarely arrive here alive.»

Dr Kalliopi Katte recalls helping firemen recover a badly decomposed body found in the shallows of Ikaria's north shore

«More bodies have surfaced recently – some in an advanced state of decay. On 5 January, a young woman was found bobbing in the shallows of the north shore, 10 kilometres from Iero.
“She was completely naked,” remembers Kalliopi Katte, the doctor who lifted her onto a stretcher. “It was an awful sight because although she had her arms and legs, her face was missing. There was no skin or flesh. It was just a skull.” The woman’s belly was bloated, not from pregnancy, but from the gases emanating from her decomposing bowels. Katte believes she had been at the bottom of the sea for about two weeks.
Like the other bodies, it too had to be cut loose from a life vest that failed to save the woman’s life.
The patch of coast where the body was found is so remote. Katte and three firemen had to carry the body up a mountainside for an hour to reach the nearest road.
“The bodies are always found after strong northern winds because they’ve sunk to the bottom of the sea and the weather brings them up against the rock,” says Katte. “The bodies have been eaten by fish – they’re not just decomposing.”»

Fisherman Nikos Avayannis (centre) salts sardines for bait.

«Some 3,771 refugees were recorded as dead or missing in the Mediterranean last year. In Greek and Turkish waters alone, 320 people have drowned or gone missing just since the beginning of the year, according to the International Organization for Migration. Yet these figures do not tell the whole story.
Even in death there are degrees of misfortune. Some dead are recovered, identified, and shipped home for burial. Some are listed as missing but never found. Some are found but remain unidentified; and there are those who are never sought and never found, because no witnesses survived their shipwreck, and no bodies washed up. The sea has claimed them without a trace, so they form an unknown statistic.
“Often in the straits we find life vests and other objects from shipwrecks in the nets,” says fisherman Nikos Avayannis. “I once found a backpack. We took it on board and searched for a survivor but didn’t find one. We delivered it to the authorities. It had clothes in it, some headphones from a cell phone and some documents.”
Avayannis believes that the owner of the backpack may have ended up part of that ghostly statistic of unclaimed, undiscovered dead. “If a body hasn’t been hit by a propeller and chopped to pieces, it floats and gets thrown out onto shore. If the current takes a body onto jagged rocks with caves, it’s possible that it will never be found.”
The rumour that fish are now eating dead refugees has turned many of Avayannis’ customers away. “A few days ago, as I was selling fish, two or three of my customers said, ‘as long as people are drowning we are going to abstain from fish.’»

A mass grave for refugees lies under unmarked, freshly turned earth, beside the graves of the island's residents

«Greek law demands an autopsy after every non-natural death. After that, the fate of a body depends on whether surviving relatives are available to identify it. “When relatives decide to bury them in Greece, it is usually done in the Muslim cemeteries on Rhodes and Kos. If they are Christians, they can be buried in one of the local cemeteries,” says Erasmia Roumana of the UN’s refugee agency, UNHCR. “The other choice is repatriation of the body, usually taken by Iraqi nationals.” For Syrians and Afghans, repatriating the bodies of family members to their war-torn countries is not an option.
When bodies are found, they are taken to Ikaria’s hospital. There, doctors pronounce death and take hair and tissue samples, which are preserved in brine. The entire package of paperwork and DNA evidence is then forwarded to the nearest district attorney – in this case on the island of Samos.
Surgeon John Tripoulas is still haunted by the experience of examining the body of an eight- to 10-year-old girl who had been in the sea for weeks, and was so close to disintegrating, rescue workers had to lift her up by her clothes. Her flesh was “saponified” he said – a term meaning it had literally developed a soap-like consistency.
“I’ll never forget what she was wearing,” says Tripoulas. “Pink sweatpants with a Mickey Mouse patch; white boots and a pink overcoat. Her facial features were not visible – [they] had been lost to the sea.”
This information, included on the death certificate, is perhaps all that is known about the girl; but even this may prove vital in one day informing her family of her ultimate fate.
“We use anything we can for recognition, such as clothing or jewellery or a manicure,” says Katte, the doctor who recalled helping to retrieve the young woman’s body on 5 January.
The only identifying objects on her faceless corpse had been five carved gold bracelets, now buried with her in a mass grave at Ikaria’s cemetery.»

The Aegean’s nameless dead
source
.
.
.

Let me repeat: don’t comment.
Befriend with sorrow and act.

.
😐 😐 😐

 

Ikaria, February 18, 2016

.
.


Back home for Christmas


.

dream steamer

Γεια σας 🙂
βρισκομαι στην Ικαρια και δεν αντεχω παρα να γραψω στη γλωσσα του τοπου, δηλαδη στα Ελληνικα. Ειναι χειμωνας, εποχη για παλιες ιστοριες. Ομως δεν μου βγαινει να σας πω μια δικη μου γιατι ειμαι πολυ κουρασμενη.
^^’
.
Για την Ικαρία του 1978-80 στο 'Πύραυλος των Υπογείων' του Βασίλη Ηλιακόπουλου με τίτλο: 'Back Home for Christmas'Αντι για μενα λοιπον, καλυτερα να διαβασετε το γραπτο του Βασιλη Ηλιακοπουλου απο το μπλογκ του που λεγεται «Πυραυλος των Υπογειων» και εχει τιτλο: Back home for Christmas. Απο τις πρόσθετες φωτογραφιες μερικες ειναι δικες μου και οι υπολοιπες ανηκουν σε γνωστους και αγνωστους φιλους απο το Flickr. Με αυτες τις προσθηκες προσπαθησα να αποδωσω εικονικα, αν και χωρις να δείξω προσωπα και παλιες καταστασεις, παρα μονο σκηνες του τοπιου, κατι απο την κλειστη και τραχεια, ομως τοσο θερμη και οικεια σε μενα, το περαστικο πουλι, ατμοσφαιρα που περιγραφει ο Ηλιακοπουλος.

Back home for Christmas

Armenistis Ikaria winter wave

«Έχω βρεθεί καταχείμωνο στην Ικαρία, τότε που οι λιγοστοί κάτοικοι λουφάζουν περιμένοντας να περάσουν οι δύσκολες εποχές. Αγριεμένος ο καιρός, τρία μέτρα ψηλή η θάλασσα, ορμάει με πάταγο στην προκυμαία και η νύχτα προμηνύεται όλο βουητό και αντάρα. Ο Αρμενιστής, ένα παλιό ψαροχώρι, εκτεθειμένο στους βορεινούς καιρούς, δεν κρατάει το χειμώνα πάνω από τριάντα ανθρώπους. Όσοι δεν κάθονται γύρω από τη σπιτική φωτιά μαζεύονται στον καφενέ, τραβούν τα παραθυρόφυλλα και τις ξύλινες πόρτες που μαστιγώνονται από θαλασσινές ριπές. Παλιοί ναυτικοί και μετανάστες που γύρισαν ύστερα από χρόνια στην Αμερική, βολεύονται γύρω απ’ τη σόμπα, ψήνουν κάστανα και πίνουν ρακί.»

Armenistis Ikaria winter calm with a bird on a rock

«Ο μπάρμπα-Δημήτρης, ο Κόχυλας, ο καφετζής, άρχοντας της λιτότητας, αράζει σ’ έναν πάγκο στη γωνία, χωμένος σ’ ένα βαρύ δερματόδετο βιβλίο που αν κανείς κάνει τον κόπο και πλησιάσει, θα διαβάσει: “Απομνημονεύματα του Στρατηγού Σαράφη„. Η γυναίκα του, η κυρά-Μαρία, όρθια στην άλλη γωνία, στην κουζίνα, τηγανίζει ψαράκια που τσιτσιρίζουν στο τηγάνι της. Ο καφενές τρίζει από την επίθεση των καιρών και όσοι είναι μαζεμένοι γύρω από τη σόμπα ξαναμμένοι από τη ρακή, το ρίχνουν στη συζήτηση για τα καράβια που έπιαναν παλιά στην Ικαρία.»

Armenistis Ikaria winter storm and rainbow splash by Wim De Weerdt on Flickr

«Το μεγάλο ερώτημα που ρίχτηκε στη κουβέντα, είναι: “Πότε ήρθε για τελευταία φορά το Μιμίκα Λ. στον Αρμενιστή„. Ήταν το ’47 ή το ’49; Για όσους δεν ξέρουν τι λαός είναι οι Ικαριώτες, πρέπει να πω ότι είναι πρωτομάστορες του καλαμπουριού και των ιστοριών. Όταν άρχιζε ο Στρατής ο Αφιανές ερχότανε μια στιγμή που βρισκόσουνα, χωρίς να το καταλάβεις, κυκλωμένος από παντού να τσαλαβουτάς μέσα στο τραγελαφικό και το παράδοξο. Κι όταν σηκωνότανε όρθιος ο Σταμάτης ο Κόχυλας, ο μεγάλος αδελφός του μπάρμπα-Δημήτρη, που ’χε κι αυτός έναν μικρό καφενέ πάνω από την προκυμαία, κοντός, ξερακιανός, αργομίλητος, τότε απλωνότανε νεκρική σιγή. Κι έπειτα, τα καλαμπούρια. Οι Ικαριώτες μπορούν να πειράζουν ο έναν τον άλλον για μια ολόκληρη νύχτα. Το κάνουν σαν ένα παιχνίδι που γυρίζει γύρω-γύρω κι αυτός που αρχίζει θα δεχτεί με τη σειρά του τα πειράγματα των άλλων. Άντρες πλατύστερνοι και βαριοκόκκαλοι, γέρνουν πάνω στην καρέκλα και με μάτια που λάμπουν από περιπαικτική διάθεση αμολάν το καλαμπούρι ενώ με τα χοντροδάχτυλά τους τρίβουν το κάστανο και ταυτόχρονα περιεργάζονται μία το θύμα και μία τις αντιδράσεις της παρέας. Ώρες-ώρες ο καφενές σείεται από τα γέλια. Πότε ήταν λοιπόν, το ’47 ή το ’49; Ήταν πριν από το γάμο του Τάσου του Φραγκούλη ή τότε που ο Τσαντίρης ο γέρος γύρισε από το Σικάγο και είπε ότι θέλει ν’ αφήσει τα κόκαλά του εδώ πέρα στα χώματα τα πατρογονικά.»

Eleni in Ikaria, February 08, 2006, thalassograph 2

«Όποιος δεν καλοθυμάται γίνεται αντικείμενο γενικής θυμηδίας. Μετά η συζήτηση προχωράει στα παλιά καράβια. Το Προπολεμικό «Φρίντο» που έκαιγε κάρβουνο, το «Παντελής», το «Δεσποινάκι» και η «Μαριλένα» πρώην «Κωστάκης Τόγιας». Μετά ερχότανε το «Μυρτιδιώτισσα» η «Μιμίκα Λ» και τα ιταλικά: ο «Κολοκοτρώνης», ο «Καραϊσκάκης» και το «Έλλη». Καράβια, φαντάσματα καραβιών που πέρναγαν σαν παλιές γκραβούρες μέσα απ’ την κουβέντα τους.»

Lighthouse in Armenistís by Ralf Moritz on Flickr

«Αλήθεια, τι απόσταση από το “Μιμίκα Λ.„ μέχρι το “Αιγαίο„! Κι από το Ο/Γ “Αιγαίο„ στις αρχές της δεκαετίας του ’80 ως τα σήμερα, τέλη του ’90. Παλιά σιδερένια βαπόρια με στρογγυλές πρύμνες, μυτερές πλώρες και ξύλινα καταστρώματα. Παστωμένα με άσπρη λαδομπογιά, με δερμάτινους καναπέδες και ξύλινες επενδύσεις. Το “Αιγαίο„ παλιό και ταλαιπωρημένο διέσχιζε το Ικάριο, βυθιζόταν με την πλώρη μέσα στο κύμα κι όταν σηκωνότανε πάνω από την ίσαλο γραμμή έβλεπες τα μίνια και τις ξεφλουδισμένες μπογιές του. Οι Ικαριώτες όμως ήταν βαθιά δεμένοι μ’ αυτό το πλοίο. Τους έφερνε στον Πειραιά μ’ όλους τους καιρούς κι από κει πίσω στο σπίτι τους. Γέρνανε στις κουπαστές και αγναντεύαν το νησί τους καθώς το καράβι έπλεε κατά μήκος του για μια ολόκληρη ώρα γιατί είναι ένα εξαιρετικά μακρόστενο νησί η Ικαρία.»

Hand by Eva Devriendt on Flickr

«Όπως το πλοίο έβγαινε από τον Άγιο Κήρυκο και τράβαγε δυτικά παραπλέοντας όλη τη νότια πλευρά του νησιού που την δέρνει το Ικάριο δείχνανε ο ένας στον άλλο με το δάχτυλο, και ονομάζανε με το όνομά τους, όλα τα χωριά, ένα, ένα. Γέροι με χοντρά τζην και καρρώ πουκάμισα φοράγανε εκείνα τα παλιά αμερικάνικα γυαλιά με τον μαύρο σκελετό που έδιναν οι αμερικάνικες κοινωνικές υπηρεσίες, το αμερικάνικο ΙΚΑ, στη δεκαετία του ’60. Στις πλάτες τους κρεμόταν ο γυλιός φτιαγμένος από δέρμα κατσίκας με το τρίχωμα προς τα έξω. Γυναίκες μαντηλοδεμένες, νύφες, γαμπροί, παιδιά.»

ikarialandscape by Gabriela Sofia Flores Schnaider inside album Ikaria on Flickr

«Διακρίνανε τα χωριά το ένα μετά το άλλο και στο τέλος πια τον Μαγγανίτη και μετά το Καρκινάγρι, που κρέμονταν πάνω στον απόκρημνο βράχο. Ξεχώριζαν το δρόμο που χρόνια τώρα πάσχιζε, με τις μπουλντόζες και τα φουρνέλα, ν’ ανοίξει η ΜΟΜΑ για να ενώσει το νησί. Κι όταν προσπέρναγαν το ακρωτήριο Παππάς, με τον φάρο του, τότε ήσυχοι πια κατέβαιναν στα σαλόνια του καραβιού και παρέες-παρέες άνοιγαν τα φαγητά με τα κεφτεδάκια και το ψωμοτύρι και τραβάγανε κοντά τη νταμιτζάνα με το κόκκινο Ικαριώτικο κρασί.»

« . . . »

.
.

Τι ωραιο κειμενο! ^^’
Καλε μου αγνωστε αναγνωστη αν θελεις κι ενα οχι για τη θαλασσα αλλα για το βουνο της ιδιας ή πιο παλιας εποχης, διαβασε στο μπλογκ της Νανας το:

Ήμεσσαν τρεις ψυχεροί ελόου μας…

.
⭐ ⭐ ⭐
.

 

.
.
.

Κι αν θες τη γνωμη μου, πιστευω οτι και σημερα πισω απο το τσιμεντο, τα μηχανηματα και το τουριστικο πασαλειμμα επικαλυμμα, κατι δυνατο απο ολα αυτα υπαρχει ακομα.  ❤

Ελενη Ικ.
Ικαρια, 27 Ιανουαριου 2016

.
.


Simply UK post produced!


Click to be redirected to my friend Nana to agrimi's blog. Common standard WP reblogging wouldn't be enough for that wonderful entry, that wonderful content!
i miss everything She didn't belong to anywhere and never really belonged to anyone. And everyone else belonged somewhere and to someone.

Forest nymphs In the clouds


Το Πέλαγος του Βοριά



.

 .

 .

Ikaria 157 - The Sea

.Τ ο  π έ λ α γ ο ς  τ ο υ  β ο ρ ι ά

 

Εκείνο που οι Αμερικάνοι

όταν έρχονται, ονομάζουν

καμιά φορά Ωκεανό

γιατί δεν φαίνεται

τίποτα στον ορίζοντα

σαν να είναι η άκρη

κάποιας ηπείρου,

αφού βρέξει και έχουν πλυθεί

οι αιθέρες και έχει απλωθεί

σιγαλιά, τότε πότε-πότε

μου δίνει

και βλέπω

διάφορα.

Παραδείγματος χάριν:

Πρώτα, τα δελφίνια,

κι ύστερα μια ψαρόβαρκα

που κάθε μέρα ψαρεύει

επίμονα στο ίδιο σημείο.

Στο βάθος, μακριά στο κανάλι

περνούν φορτηγά φορτωμένα ίσως

τσιμέντο, σιτάρι, αυτοκίνητα,

εκτυπωτές. Και γιγαντιαία

πετρελαιοφόρα.

Αργότερα λίγο πριν σουρουπώσει,

μπορεί να δω σαν φάντασμα να περνάει

καμιά πυραυλάκατος,

ή ένα -πιο ειρηνικό-

μικρό ιστιοπλοϊκό

που θέλω να πιστεύω

πως θα ‘ναι κανείς

Νορβηγός που κάνει

το γύρο του κόσμου,

ή ακόμα ίσως μια φίλη μου

που βαρέθηκε “να κάνει

αθροίσεις σε χοντρά

λογιστικά βιβλία”.

Όταν νυχτώνει περνούνε περίλαμπρα

τα κρουαζιερόπλοια: Μασσαλία,

Νάπολη, Μύκονος, Έφεσος.

Ίσως την ίδια ώρα, απ’ την άλλη μεριά

ξεκινούν να περάσουν απέναντι

στα μουλωχτά γυναικόπαιδα

μετανάστες τους προμαχώνες

του Κάστρου Ευρώπη.

Κι επιτέλους κάποια ώρα

διασχίζει το μαύρο τελάρο

κάτι πιο γνώριμο, το καράβι

απ’ τον Πειραιά, εκείνο που

φέρνει τον καφέ μου και τα τσιγάρα μου.

Φωτοβολίδες, ανεμοστρόβιλοι, παράξενες αναλαμπές,

σύννεφα σαν αρχάγγελοι, μια φορά μου φάνηκε πως

είδα ένα φυσητήρα (διάβασα κι έμαθα πως πράγματι

συχνάζουν), μεγάλα πουλιά, γερανοί, πελαργοί,

αγριόκυκνοι.

Μια μέρα ονειρεύομαι πως θα φανεί εκείνο

το μαύρο πειρατικό με τα πενήντα κανόνια

που γράφει ο Μπρεχτ στο τραγούδι του Βάιλ,

ίσως ακόμα την ίδια την Pirate Jenny,

θριαμβεύουσα.

Γιατί στο πέλαγο μπορεί να δει κανείς

otinanai

Γιατί στο πέλαγο…

ta panta rei

 .

.

Εδω Ελενη.

Καθως βρισκομαι στην Ικαρια σημερα ειχα διαθεση να παρουσιασω στο μπλογκ μου το παραπανω ποιητικο κειμενο που εγραψε αγαπημενος φιλος γι αυτα που βλεπουμε με τα ματια του σωματος και της ψυχης οταν απο τα βουνα του νησιου μας αγναντευουμε το πελαγος.

Το Πελαγος του Βορια” ανηκει στη σειρα otinanaiπου ο φιλος μου δημοσιευει σχεδον καθε μηνα στο ikariamag, το διαδικτυακο περιοδικο της Ικαριας που μας ενημερωνει και μας κραταει συντροφια.

Ελεύθερες Πτήσεις : otinanai

Για να το εικονογραφησει, διαλεξε μια φωτογραφια που εβγαλα εγω καποτε σε μια χειμωνιατικη πεζοπορια στα βουνα και μου εκανε μεγάλη χαρα και τιμη λεγοντας μου πως του εδωσε εμπνευση.

Χαρα και τιμη οχι ομως εκπληξη. Μοιραζομαστε την ιδια αγαπη για τους ανοιχτους πελαγισιους οριζοντες, την ίδια φαντασια και περιεργεια για τα θεαματα και τα θαυματα που κρυβουν και φανερωνουν. Αληθεια, αυτο το κομματι θα μπορουσαμε να το ειχαμε γραψει μαζι.

Πφφφ… κολακευομαι…

Στην πραγματικοτητα ειναι ολο δικο του.

Γι αυτο, αναδημοσιευοντας στο μπλογκ μου, αντισταθηκα στον πειρασμο και δεν προσθεσα αλλες φωτογραφιες εκτος απο τις αρχικες, δηλαδη εκτος απο τη δικη μου στην αρχη και της Πελαγιας απο τη Σαμοθρακη στο τελος.

.Καλο Χειμωνα

 .

Wild Shots


Ikaria

.

A lot of word is made in this blog about my friend, Nana, and her doings with me or with own her friends in Ikaria. I feel that though I have said much, I have shown relatively few pictures. So there you are, take these randomly chosen snapshots. Some are totally random and some from a wild ride in the south west of the island last week. 😀

The photos open to the relative entries of her own blog. Drop by and say something.

on stacking stones

on stacking stones

.
kitten boots

kitten boots

.
dreamcatcher

dream catcher

.
daydream stream

daydream tiny stream

.
smooth white rock 3

sea cave

.
smooth white rock 2

climb smooth white rock

.
smooth white rock 1

walk smooth white rock

.
cairn in kourelos

cairn in kourelos

.
Wild coast

Wild coast

.
Elias Kampos

Elias Kampos

.
Elina in Kalou Ikaria

Elina in Kalou Ikaria

.
Kalou little beach

Kalou little beach

.
The usual disproportionate road works

The usual disproportionate road works

.
permaculture garden and basket

permaculture garden and basket

.
Master Bedroom!

Master Bedroom!

.

a pink woolen hood of a baby – ενα ροζ μωρουδιστικο σκουφακι


After a hard summer’s work I usually visit Ikaria in late September or early October. The first thing I (at least try to) do is go for a long exhausting swim in the sea -no matter what time of the day it is or what the weather is like. This is a catharsis: my own version of the age old «40 waves cure» (*)

It was on a day like this when I had just arrived in Ikaria and I was taking the waves to absolve my sins (from a very competitive and very air-conditioned work environment). As I swam along the rocky coast, I saw something that looked like an old tent or a sail of a boat. I swam near it and saw it was actually the wreck of an inflattable zodiac raft. My first thought was to drag it to the shore and tell a friend who would be glad to be its new owner. So I swam round it and searched the sides with my hands to find a handle or rope to hold it. I grabbed something which I thought was a rag. I pulled it and …in my hand I had a soaking wet pink woolen hood of a baby!..

There was a family (perhaps two or three) in that 6×2 raft. Kurds, Iraquis, Persians, Pakistanese, Afganese? Who knows? What’s the difference. These are the ones who die in the dark when the squalls flood their zodiacs.
I came out on the coast, put my arms round a warm rock and prayed (**)

That day a fuse burnt in my mind and since then I went stupid (…)

Don’t bother doctor… I don’t want to be cured from this.

(για την ακριβεια θελω να γινω εντελως ηλιθια, τελειως βλαμενη…)

My work on the project will be gratis and I hope that what ever money they make from it on TV will go to campaign against trafficking and slave trade.

Comments

(9 total)

(*my grandmother’s advice: when you feel weary, loaded with thousands of small nameless sins, when you feel you have «lost yourself» or «lost God» or the meaning of life, etc. etc., the right thing to do is to go through the 40 waves. Walk in the sea as far from the land as your feet hardly touch bottom. Stay there and let the surf cover your head forty times. It has to be all in once and you can’t take breaks, otherwise you have to start from the begining. The sea cleans dirt and takes away all kinds of small trouble.)

Friday March 10, 2006 – 09:45am (PST)

(** I don’t believe in God, so my prayers have no words. Still I very often «say» my inarticulate prayers and in my head they ring like music.)

Friday March 10, 2006 – 09:46am (PST)

You’re so cool Elle. So many people seek shelter from the storm! I think though I will skip that form of absolution (the verb is absolve by the way 😉 Prefer to work hard at moving onward always, blindly when necessary, and never forget to have fun. Good wine helps!

Friday March 10, 2006 – 11:52am (PST)

Don’t worry, friend ! I’m a good swimmer and not that stupid (as yet, for later who knows?)

Friday March 10, 2006 – 01:50pm (PST)

‘move on blindly’ : a good one
This is more or less the idea =>what I’m always asking her to do.
This is very strong in Jeffry Eugenides’ book, «Middlesex».
Anyone here read that?

** sis, add some webliography on the subject and move on to a next one (with «eyes wide shut»… haha)
*** get your share of the money -no gratis . You are not tha-a-at famous or rich to afford this luxury…

(**** in any case, if you insist on moving with your eyes open, be sure that you will always have me, blind girl, by your side to guide you blindly through whatever.)

Saturday March 11, 2006 – 10:18am (EET)

«It’s all in the sea; the battle of life is there, and the futility of it all, and the purpose». I can do no better than quote the artist L.S. Lowry talking about one of his seascapes. Dr. S.

Sunday March 12, 2006 – 11:20pm (GMT)

can do no better? just did the best..

Monday March 13, 2006 – 03:12am (PST)

I read «Middlesex»! A good book.
Calliope’s granparents, they too were refugees coming from a sad story. And they never found a new absolute identity (nor a sexual one his nephew, as the story tells). And this often is the tragedy of survivors…

Monday March 13, 2006 – 11:42pm (CET)

quite right. «Middlesex» is big!

Tuesday March 14, 2006 – 02:13am (PST)


the squall photos * το ραγάνι


.
 slideshow

Το σλάιντ απαιτεί την χρήση JavaScript.

ΝΤΟΥΡΝΑ
—————

Ήλιε μου στο βασιλεμό θέ να σου παραγγείλω
-ντούρνα, ντούρνα, ντούρνα, μας έπιασε φουρτούνα-
να πάεις να μου χαιρετάς το κόκκινό μου μήλο.
Ντούρνα, ντούρνα, ντούρνα, μας έπιασε φουρτούνα,
ε, γιαλελί κακούργα, μας έπιασε φουρτούνα.

……

(1st verse tranlated+comments)

DURNA
———–

Before you set, oh, my sun, I’d like very much to ask you
-durna**, durna, durna, we are caught in the storm-
to go and say hello from me, hello to my red apple.
Durna, durna, durna, we are caught in a storm,
ride on us swift murderess, we are caught in a storm….

* the Greek word for sunset is «helio-vasilema» =when the sun reigns or rules !
I looked it up in all sorts of dictionaries and still this word remains a mystery for me. It’s so common, even used metaphorically. When I stay up late and my eyelids drop, my friends say: «i Eleni vasilepse» =Eleni reigned (where is my realm? the meadows of Morpheus?)
** don’t ask me what «durna» is. It looks like a word similar to «opa», «yasou» or «haide», which are yells of encouragement (to workers, dancers etc.). But it might as well derive from «dur» which is «stop» in Turkish.
So you have: «stop, stop and turn round (sail slower, lower sails -whatever), because we are caught in a storm».


Ήλιε μου ίντα σου ‘κανα και πας να βασιλέψεις
-ντούρνα, ντούρνα, ντούρνα, μας έπιασε φουρτούνα-
κι αφήνεις με στα σκοτεινά και πας αλλού να φέξεις;
Ντούρνα, ντούρνα, ντούρνα, μας έπιασε φουρτούνα,
ε, γιαλελί κακούργα, μας έπιασε φουρτούνα.

….

(2nd verse tranlated)

DURNA
———–

Oh, sun, what have I done to you and now you are setting
-durna**, durna, durna, we are caught in the storm-
and you are leaving me in the dark, you go shining on other places.
Durna, durna, durna, we are caught in a storm,
ride on us swift murderess, we are caught in a storm….
…….

** Don’t ask me what «durna» is. It looks like a word similar to «opa», «yasou» or «haide», which are yells of encouragement (to workers, dancers etc.). But it might as well derive from «dur» which is «stop» in Turkish.
So you have: «stop, stop and turn round (sail slower, lower sails -whatever), because we are caught in a storm».


ride on. squalls, swift murderesses…

These photos go with a story I’m making in my mind and writing down. They are a very important part of one of the three projects I’m working on. They were taken with «fast mode» so they are not good for Flickr. This one in particular is a zoom in of «la tromba marina».

 

άμε και πάλι γύρισε πουλί μ’ αγαπημένο
-ντούρνα, ντούρνα, ντούρνα, μας έπιασε φουρτούνα-
και μη μ’ αφήνεις μοναχό και παραπονεμένο
Ντούρνα, ντούρνα, ντούρνα, μας έπιασε φουρτούνα,
ε, γιαλελί κακούργα, μας έπιασε φουρτούνα.

————————————————————————–

Go, my beloved bird, make sure you come back to me again
-durna**, durna, durna, we are caught in the storm-
don’t leave me here to whine all lonely,
oh, ride on us swift murderess, we are caught in a storm….

dedicated to ImageNana who sailed away this evening
(ας το καλο .. η Ελενη το γερακι του Αιγαιου κ.τλ., μη χ…, με πηραν τα ζουμια Imageσαν συναχωμενη κοτα -συγνωμη αναγνωστες.)
And let me tell you another thing. I don’t care what ‘durna’ means really. For me right now ‘durna’ is ‘rentres’, ‘retournes’

And I like to think of the ship in these photos that it is the
«‘Je Reviens Toujours»‘ ^^’

..Finally the original version of the song is…

ΤΟΥΡΝΑ, 1927, ΜΑΡΙΚΑ ΠΑΠΑΓΚΙΚΑ


.

Comments

(5 total)

helio vasilema – interesting! I figured I’d look in the classical dictionaries, but all I found was this:

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text.jsp?doc=Perseus:text:1999.04.0057:entry=ba^si^leu/w

So, in ancient days basileuo meant «rule» only. No mention of it ever used with the sun or with eyes. Perhaps someone decided that the end of the day is when the sun conquers the sky, and from that meaning it got the eyes closing idea. (yeah, that’s quite a stretch)

Saturday March 4, 2006 – 01:59am (EST)

Or is the sun returning to its kingdom beyond the West?

Is Dari Dari similar to Dourna Dourna? (In that other sea-song).

Saturday March 4, 2006 – 10:53am (GMT)

(* I use ‘tufts’ too!)
(** «Streched» is a good key to unlock Greece)
(*** semiotics is another good key but it takes skill and wisdom)
(**** no, «dari-dari» is something like «yeah-yeah, shake it baby». «Durna» sounds like a military or marine command. You have to hear a Turkish policeman say «dur» and you know.)
A BRIGHT IDEA ! (confirm AKK, please…): the king was associated with purpple colour in the middle ages. So you had the «purple born ones» for the royal family because they lived in rooms painted in purple . A sunset is purple. The sun goes to bed in his purple room. The sun is a byzantine emperor.
(help!! have I gone too far with «images»?)

Sunday March 5, 2006 – 04:02am (PST)

Confirmation? I’d give you 3 PhDs for that !
No kidding Ele ! you found it ! I can’t believe it !
Have you read about it or is it intuition? Such a long shot, so succesful !
Ο ήλιος βασιλεύει (o ilios vasilevi) =the sun retires in his purple coloured quarters. These rooms were legendary. The walls were covered with silk dyed in the «true purple» colour -extracted from the seashell ‘purpura persica’. Only kings could wear or live in that colour (I mean the ‘true purple’, not just ‘rich’ deep red). But about all that you can read in many books. From this to the point of undestanding the connection between a sunset and the purple imperial rooms of Byzance… it takes a … (I don’t know what it takes…)
Anyway…
BRAVO !!

Sunday March 5, 2006 – 09:27pm (EET)

Haven’t I said purple is one of my favourite colours? I know a lot about it. Though that was a very long shot and thanks for the confirmation and the 3 PhDs. The original idea came from my old neighbour. Once she said that farmers of the old days in Ikaria went to bed right after the sunset when the sky was purple. They were satisfied and the felt like the kings and queens who were «born in the purple rooms» of the palace in Constantinople.
There are many medieval traditions surviving in the islands of the Aegean sea. Warm human stuff… «true purple» colour like the island’s wine.

Monday March 6, 2006 – 12:26pm (PST)

More Comments

(6 total)

Do you know who are these swift killers after these days?
Who get caught in squalls and die at sea after sunset these days? Who beg the sun not to set?

Friday March 3, 2006 – 02:50pm (PST)

powerful stuff Eleni….

Saturday March 4, 2006 – 12:23am (GMT)

  • greg

I think I’m not giving you the answer you seek, but being from a family of sailors, I can say it is fishermen and sailors who fear the storm. As we say here, red sky at night, sailor’s delight, red sky in the morning, sailor’s warning.

Friday March 3, 2006 – 04:48pm (PST)

Of course, the sailors and fishermen -pirates and smugglers too. But I’m thinking of (and weeping over) something else.
That was the reason I fixed and put for an ID that «CD cover» photo with the lighthouse.

3l3ni

Sunday March 5, 2006 – 03:43am (PST)

Έλεος ! θα μας σκάσεις! που το πας; ποιούς σκοτώνουν σήμερα τα ραγάνια όταν βραδιάζει; Πες μας, αν αγαπάς.

Sunday March 5, 2006 – 09:21pm (EET)

μεγαλη επιτυχια, αν καταφερα να σε κανω να κοντευεις να σκασεις… Εχω τωρα τη Ν στο σπιτι και δεν βρισκω ευκαιρια να γραψω τη συνεχεια.

Monday March 6, 2006 – 12:24pm (PST)

More Comments

(5 total)

  • Jimmy P

what I love in this blog is his multilingual mode: you are greek and write in english as everibody do as it was obvious.
sometimes you talk in greek, you’re right: it’s your langage… and now you call your story «la tromba marina»: this is my idiom! allegria! viva la multiculturalità, viva i popoli provenienti da paesi diversi che si prendono simbolicamente per mano grazie all’incredibile intervento di internet! maintenant je suis tres curious de connaitre l’histoire de la tromba et je veux tu la conte in francais pourquoi personne parle jamais les mots de Depardieu et je suis secure il nous regarde. A bientot Gerard!

Tuesday March 7, 2006 – 01:57am (CET)

D’ accord, mon fou de la Magna Grecia. Je vais raconter l’ histoire en Francais aussi. Depardieu (j’ai failli ecrire ‘Depart-dieu’) a joue Jean Val Jean aux ‘Miserables’. C’est tres a propos.

Tuesday March 7, 2006 – 12:51pm (PST)

  • Ψαλακ…

Heu Heu! Tot linguae in una loca collectae sunt.

Knew that degree in classics would come in handy one day.

Tuesday March 7, 2006 – 07:59pm (EST)

quite right -I don’t know how I’d survive from my work and my social life without the classics whispering in my ear in 3 different lang. Hip-hop helps a lot too, btw (sorry classics!)

Wednesday March 8, 2006 – 01:03pm (EET)

Eleni I forgot and didn’t tell you in Ikaria that translating ‘gialeli’ as ‘ride on us’ is genius !
Durna or Turna is the Turkish word for «crane», the beautiful migrating bird!!! ^^’
The song is about migration, homesickness and love ❤ ❤ ❤

Wednesday March 8, 2006 – 01:07pm (EET)