Picture and Poem to match (October 08, 2006)


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https://i1.wp.com/static.flickr.com/81/236202498_b07243c99d_o.jpg

I have seen old ships sail like swans asleep
Beyond the village which men still call Tyre,
With leaden age o’ercargoed, dipping deep
For Famagusta and the hidden sun
That rings black Cyprus with a lake of fire;
And all those ships were certainly so old —
Who knows how oft with squat and noisy gun,
Questing brown slaves or Syrian oranges,
The pirate Genoese
Hell-raked them till they rolled
Blood, water, fruit and corpses up the hold.
But now through friendly seas they softly run,
Painted the mid-sea blue or shore-sea green,
Still patterned with the vine and grapes in gold.

James Elroy Flecker

I received this poem as a comment by an Irish friend in one of my pictures

in Flickr under the title «Redemption».

In a few days I will have it traνslated in Greek :

«Ειδα τα παλια καραβια να περνουν

αρμενιζοντας κοιμισμενα σαν κυκνοι...»

(Ετσι, για να θυμηθουμε τους Παρνασιστες ποιητες. Και για να μη με αποκαλουν ολη την ωρα μερικοι-μερικοι, Μανω-λενη …Αναγνωστακη ! )

which colour is your favourite?
Syrian orange?
0
Mid-sea-blue?
0
Shore-sea-green?
2
Slave brown?
1
Vine green?
0
Grape gold?
0
The colour of my photo?
9
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Comments

(8 total)

Smart poll that one, oh Parnassian… You’ve made us imagine and God knows how much we need colours!…
Try your hand with a translation. I’m very curious. Does the poem have a title?

Monday October 9, 2006 – 11:09pm (EEST)

glacier blue

Monday October 9, 2006 – 02:44pm (PDT)

glacier blue’s cool… tooo coool … brrr!…

Tuesday October 10, 2006 – 11:43am (PDT)

xou-hartabar pok pok ? that’s a cool new link on your blog-roll! yes, «the wheel» has spun a goo-ood round!
May *the force* be with us…

Saturday October 14, 2006 – 09:47pm (EEST)

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breaking news: Baby St. John presides Greek solistice festivities again this year.


Pretty young girl jumping the fires of Saint John in Ikaria

Dear readers, I can’t but share with you these wonderful photos from the ritual of «Klidonas» in Ikaria which took place on Saturday, June 24 in a little chapel celebrating Saint John in the forest just outside Christos Raches. Related to summer solstice, this ritual is practiced in many places around the world in wilder or milder ways. The description of the ritual is this:


«The 24th of June is one of the biggest summer festivals of Greek tradition, since the feast of St. John the “Klidonas” is accompanied by the traditional custom of burning the flower wreaths of May and passing over the fires.
The nickname «Klidonas» comes from the ancient Greek word «κλήδων» (klidon), meaning “the predictor sound” and was used to describe the combination of random and incoherent words during a divination ceremony.
Essentially «Klidonas» is associated with a folk, divination process, which is said to reveal to the unmarried girls the identity of their future husband.
According to custom, on the eve of St. John’s celebration, the single girls are gathered in one of the houses of the village and one of them goes to the well to bring the «silent water». It is called that way because she must speak to no one of the way to and back from the well.
At home they pour the water into a clay pot in which each girl throws a personal object, called “rizikari” (coming from the word “riziko” which means destiny). Then and then they cover up the pot with a red cloth and tie it up while praying in St. John. Afterwards they place the pot in open space, where it stays overnight. On that same night, Is said that the girls will see in their dreams their future spouse.
Meanwhile, on the eve of Saint John celebration also revives the well-known custom with fires: At the village square they light a big fire where everybody burns the flower wreaths they made on Mayday, and over which all the villagers jamb. According to the tradition, the fire brings catharsis and people are exempted from evil.»

But enough with Greek lore. Take a look at the photos! 😀

Pretty young girl jumping the fires of Saint John in Ikaria Raches 09

Klidonas Ikaria 01 Klidonas Ikaria 02

Klidonas Ikaria 03 Klidonas Ikaria 04

Klidonas Ikaria 05 Klidonas Ikaria 06

Klidonas Ikaria 07 Klidonas Ikaria 08

It’s fun! Isn’t it!?

😀

Add to it the sound of the big bass drum banging over the fire jumpers!

😛 😛 😛