Wind-bound in Nicaria, circa 1740


.
 Old stone shelter near Langada in Ikaria
.
Hello readers!
I don’t expect this long article to become too popular. It’s just that several modern-day Ikarians show a lot of interest in knowing as much as they can about the more recent history of the island and they are usually very disappointed. Compared with other islands of the Aegean Sea, there is so little to say about Ikaria! No glorious battles, no illustrious rulers, no forts and fleets, no trading towns, no towers, cathedrals and famous monasteries; only mossy stonewalls and old thrifty houses scattered in the ravines, the valleys and the forests in the hills.
Εxcept one Greek Orthodox clergyman in the 17th century, no other educated person from East or West felt the urge to visit the island and write an account. If I’m not mistaken, the first book about the history of Ikaria appeared in the middle of the 20th century. Until then, there was no big narrative but only countless little stories told by the fireplace; persistent little stories which by force of repetition, became local legends; local legends some of which today, by force of time and culture gap, may sound like wild fairy tales.

Imaginary depiction of Charles Perry's ship wind-bound under Cape Papas in Ikaria
Neverthelss, there were some short descriptions of the life in the island during the Obscurity («Αφάνεια») as we like to call in Ikaria the first hard centuries of the Ottoman occupation. These were written by the very few European travelers who touched at our rough, inhospitable shores, often by chance or accident. In Pr A.J. Papalas’ book «Ancient Icaria» I found a reference to one of these documents, which, although brief and trivial, capticated my imagination. It is by Charles Perry, a wealthy medical doctor from England who travelled in the Levant from 1739 to 1742. After visiting Egypt, Perry sailed from Alexandria to Athens. On his way across the Aegean he visited and described the islands of Cos and Patmos. But after that island, as he was heading for Mykonos, his ship was caught in a storm and was forced to drop anchor in Ikaria.

Old settlement in Karkinagri Ikaria I liked Perry’s account. Reading his one and a half page about his accidental visit to Ikaria, I felt the genuine puzzlement of a man of the Century of Lights for the unwelcoming, extremely mountainous environment of the island and his also genuine astonishment (and contempt) for the attitude and the way of life of its inhabitants. But, most of all, I liked his account for a more personal reason: through the eyes of the good old British doctor, I saw some places of western Ikaria which I know very well, such as Karkinagri, Agios Isidoros and Langada, looking as uncanny and wild, as if we were talking about a remote, unfriendly rock in the middle of the South Pacific!
I found that very exciting! In my mind it fitted in with the other tales of my island and their mixture generated cores for several imaginary storylines! Maybe some day I’ll sit down Drawing of Imaginary Ikarians fiesting in the 18th century and write a similar story, this time not from the side of an enlightened European physician, probably wearing a powdered wig, but from the side of the «wretched, almost naked and savage» Ikarians!

😌
 ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴

Wind-bound in Nicaria, p.484 «We spent three days in Patmos, not disagreeably; and the fourth in the morning we set sail for Myconos; but the wind, which was otherwise pretty favorable, grew slack, next to a calm; so that it was with much-ado, with what wind we had, and the help of our oars, that we reached the west end of Nicaria in two days. We much lamented our hard fate, that we should thus long want a wind at such a favourable (for it) crisis of the year, it being near the Autumnal Equinox.
However, that night, about an hour after sunset, even whilst we were reproaching the malice of our stars, a fine gale sprang up. We failed not to embrace it immediately, and we went driving on, Jehu-like, with our sails full of wind and our hearts full of joy: But alas! How frail and transitory are human hopes and happiness, especially upon the sea? Within an hour after, the wind turned against us, and blew a storm; so that we were forced to change our course, and to seek shelter under a rock at the west end of Nicaria, which we did not attain, however, without much difficulty and danger.»

Wind-bound in Nicaria, p.485 «Here we lay wind-bound four nights, and above three days; during which irksome interval we amused ourselves in the best manner we could with fishing: But after we had spent two days without other recreation than fishing, that sport grew dull and tedious; and whilst we were looking out for some sport and divertissement, kind Providence (of its grace and favour) sent us the glad tidings that about a mile off, on the side of a high rocky mountain, there was a spring of excellent water, which was resorted to by great number of partridges. Upon this intelligence, (which we got the third day of our detention there) we immediately got ready arms and ammunition of all sorts, as well for the belly as the barrel -such as bread, butter, cheese, salt, pepper, wine, glasses, etc. We marched on directly, (flushed with the hopes of new game) with uncommon ardour, or rather avidity; and we were well recompensed our pains; for we passed that day very agreeably.
The mountain (though in general very steep) admits a sort of level in that place; and the spring of water issues out of a rock, in a very convenient and delightful spot, where nature or chance has formed a sort of grot, large enough to receive and accommodate a dozen or 15 persons. This natural grot (if we may so call it) is covered over, and secured against the weather, by a large flat stone of about 24 feet in diameter: This rests upon and is supported by other stones on all sides, except to the eastward; where, being open, it presents to view a sort of alcove. Here we passed the whole day (which but for that retreat would have been tedious) very agreeably -reclining upon the bed of our grot, with the water trilling along close by us, whilst our partisans upon the hunt for partridges, wild goats, and the like, of which they brought us in good store.»

Wind-bound in Nicaria, p.486 «There are some few inhabitants on this island, but those almost naked and savage, seldom seeing or conversing with any of the human species, except those of their own isle. The second day after we put in there, we sent out some of the mariners a shooting for us, who pursuing their game to the north side of the mountain, met with some of the natives. These were so affrighted at sight of strangers, that they fled from them with precipitation; but our people calling after them, and telling them they had brought them bread and corn, they at last prevailed on them to stop, and come to a party with them. These poor wretches, being at length persuaded of our good intentions, came to see us aboard our vessel, and afterwards brought us good store of grapes and meat. We were really at a loss to guess where they found those things; for the whole island, so far as we could see of it, is the most miserable, barren rock that ever was seen.
The 4th day, towards noon, the wind changing in our favour, we set sail for Myconos, which is 40 miles distant from the westernmost point of Nicaria. This (as it is to be supposed) is a run of about 7 hours, with a good brisk gale…»

 ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴  ∴

Pages 484-486 from Charles Perry’s book, «A View of the Levant», which I have arbitrarily named «Wind bound in Nicaria», can be found in Google books

Modern books about the history of Ikaria:

Pr A.J.Papalas 'Ancient Icaria' on Amazon.com A presentation of the Greek translation of Pr A.J.Papalas 'Ancient Icaria' in my blog In my blog a rather personal and enthusiastic presentation of Pr A.J.Papalas 'Rebels and Radicals', a book about the history of Ikaria after 1670

Comments on this article are very welcome!
Ελενη

😌
.

.

His island of freedom


.

Eleni on Mavri rocks

Hello readers! 🙂
how long has it been since I last wrote a blog review properly speaking – that is, to review something written by someone I don’t know? I think the last one was about Jackie Fox, the Ikarian/American who posted a whole series of wonderful articles about her life in Ikaria during the year 2012-13. Jackie published on WordPress so it was easy for me to spot her and connect to her blog articles. But this time I have in hand a rather unusual case: a facebook blogger! His name is Tolga, he is from Izmir, Turkey and he keeps a blog which he calls: «Tolga’s travels». As I am not on facebook, it wouldn’t be possible to know anything about him, but fortunately and unexpectedly his blog is public! So here I am, hard-working, cool blogger Eleni, I am blogging about his doings in Ikaria!
As I always do, I will let him speak on his own. But before that,
just let me say only two things: a) Tolga comes from Izmir, a city geographically and historically associated with our islands. It’s so close and so big that in some winter nights when the clouds are low I can see the glow of the lights of his city in the east! b) Some Turks like Tolga, also like a lot of people who come from the countries of the Eastern Mediterranean, incarnate the legendary Oriental Oral Narrator – in simpler words, they know how to tell a story and capture the listener!
Go Tolga, speak about my island – your island of freedom!
😊

As always in my blog reviews, the pictures direct to the full posts in the source -in this case, facebook. There you will find more photos with a few words for each. As you will see, I have borrowed some quotes from Tolga’s posts.  Goes without saying that I am solely responsible for my choices.

😇

Tolga’s Ikaria : Foreword

Foreword: 'I was one of those kids who loved looking at maps. We didn’t have Google Maps back then, but there were mighty world atlases and we had one of those at home. I would place it on the floor and lose myself in it. I would travel from country to country, mountain to ocean. I was always mesmerized by the map of the Aegean Sea. Perhaps because it was home, perhaps because hundreds of islands scattered across my big blue sea would allow me to create thousands of fantasies in my head, it was a magical map. From his terrace, my grandpa would point out the mountains rising from the sea several miles away and say...'

«…but then, there was another island. One that was somehow magical, and for no special reason. One that I picked for myself, my fantasy island, my island. When I told the name, very few people would have heard of it, even though it was so close to where we lived. In my child’s mind, I would be the king of my island and my own civilization. I would declare my independence lying on the floor of my bedroom, lost in the map. It was years later, when I started reading about it, I was surprised to see that my island was of the same mindset, that it had actually declared its independence in 1912, had its own flag, its own anthem, even if it had lasted for only five months. Yes, that was definitely my island…»

Tolga’s Ikaria : Day 1 – Arrival

Day 1 Arrival: 'Getting to Ikaria is no easy task, I’ll tell you. Despite being one of the largest of the Aegean islands, it seems to be somehow left out of the grid. Although it is clearly visible from the Turkish coast, it is easier to get to Mykonos or Santorini then Ikaria. Well, I hope it will stay that way. The day started early. At 6:30, I was on the bus to Kusadasi. I was sure I had a solid plan – funny me. As there are no direct boats to Ikaria from Turkey, I first had to reach Samos, from where fer-ries run to Agios Kirykos, the administrative centre of Ikaria, couple of times a week – Yes, you cannot just go to Ikaria whichever day you feel like, you have to plan!'

«Getting to Ikaria is no easy task, I’ll tell you. Despite being one of the largest of the Aegean islands, it seems to be somehow left out of the grid. Although it is clearly visible from the Turkish coast, it is easier to get to Mykonos or Santorini then Ikaria. Well, I hope it will stay that way…»

«The entertaining bit of the trip though was to overhear (ok, not overhear, simply listen, yes I like lis-tening to others’ conversations, shush!) twenty something Istanbulites discussing which beach clubs they should go to in Samos. I’m not going to get into details, but I will tell you this much: some of the Turks really have the wrong idea about the Greek islands. They get on the boat to Samos or Chios thinking they will find the same boom boom – fuck me – boom beach clubs they go to in Cesme or Bodrum, and then they are heavily disappointed. Aegean islands, perhaps with the excep-tion of Mykonos and Santorini, is about peace and tranquillity, and very very good ouzo…»

«.So here I am, sitting on my wooden throne on the beach, adoring my kingdom. I just had the most delicious grilled squid and am on my third glass of white wine. Stars are shining, there’s a gentle Greek tune coming from the back, and the sound of the waves from the front. There’s a brave woman going for a swim. Life is good. So far, I love my kingdom.»

Tolga’s Ikaria : Day 2 – Agios Kirykos

Day 2: 'Mornings of any Aegean trip has the same theme: wake up (preferably not too late), instead of jumping under the shower, jump into the sea, sit at a café, have a bite, have a coffee, and another coffee and another one. Why should today be any different? An insight to travelling in Ikaria: public transport on the island is virtually non-existent. There are two buses...'

«Mornings of any Aegean trip has the same theme: wake up (preferably not too late), instead of jumping under the shower, jump into the sea, sit at a café, have a bite, have a coffee, and another coffee and another one. Why should today be any different?»

«Ag. Kirykos is a nice island town (town – village – town? whatever), but nothing spectacular. Nice cafés by the coast to enjoy your book. Few pebble beaches around – not very comfy, but the sea is much warmer than in the nearby islands of Samos and Chios. Nice people. Yeah, that’s it. Summary of the day: swim, have coffee, read book, walk around, have more coffee, plan the next day, have another dip in the sea, and another coffee – yeah that’s really it.»

«Although Greece gained its independence from the Ottoman Empire in 1827, East Aegean Islands still remained part of the empire. In July 1912, the Ikarians said that they had enough with that and revolted under the leadership of a chap named Ioannis Malahias. The Ottomans had their own prob-lems like World War I, so as a result, Free State of Ikaria was declared an independent country on July 17th. Of course, it wasn’t the easiest of times. And with no dowry, no money, no family background, Ikarians had to be glad to be annexed by Greece only five months later in November. To this day, Ikarians are extremely proud of those five months and all around the island, you can see more Free State flags than Greek ones. The flag has a dark blue background with a white cross in the middle – basically Swiss flag turned blue.  🙂 »

Tolga’s Ikaria : Day 3 – Chalares Canyon, Nas, Armenistis

Day 3 – Chalares Canyon, Nas, Armenistis: 'The alarm started ringing at 7:00 am and I got out of the bed at once. The sun was slowly rising over Fourni putting a big smile on my face. Try to wake me up so early during the work week and God knows what I’ll do to you, but today I have a mission: I’m gonna claim the mountains of my island! I had bought stuff for today’s lunch from yesterday evening. All I needed was bread. At this hour, there are only two places open in Therma: the bakery, and interestingly enough, the thermal baths. As you would guess from the name, Therma is known for its thermal baths and you can see oldies in white bathrobes...'

«To get from the south to the north of the island, you have to go up and down the high mountains that run like the spine of Ikaria. The view on both sides is simply breath-taking. One has to be care-ful enjoying the view while driving in Ikaria though. The roads are all very narrow – at some points to the degree that two cars cannot pass at the same time. On one side of the road, there are rocks and on the other side, cliffs several hundred meters high and more rocks at the bottom. Not to worry, you are more likely to come across a goat than a car while driving on the island anyway.»

«I arrived at Nas, at the northwest end of the island towards ten o’clock. Nas is a very small village with a few hotels and restaurants that took the healthy-trendy line. Everything here is organic, healthy, super food and stuff. It’s not difficult to imagine people doing yoga on the beach at sun-rise, which I’m sure they do.»

«Ikaria has an unbelievable amount of well-marked and well-kept walking trails – one might say bet-ter marked and kept than the roads themselves. The one I was going to try today was starting at Nas and following the river along the Chalares Canyon. As the trails are never ending, I decided to walk as long as I found reasonable, then return back either using the same route or some alternative path.»

Tolga’s Ikaria : Day 4 – Evdilos, Kampos and around

Day 4 – Evdilos, Kampos and around: 'The northerly autumn winds begun caressing Ikaria this morning. The sun is still strong, but you know that it is not going to last long. Colors of the season started showing themselves on the trees at higher altitudes. It is the best time of the Aegean. The first activity of the day was a leisurely hike. After covering my feet with band-aid – I am kinda starting to see the wisdom in socks with sandals thing, but not in this lifetime – I decided to take the dirt roads going up from Kampos. It was not going to be anything difficult like yesterday’s, just a few hours of sightseeing really. The roads gently ascend the hills passing by farms and vineyards. After a few dead ends, I seem to have found my way. In any case, if you get really lost lost, just walk down till you meet the sea, not that hard.'

«The northerly autumn winds begun caressing Ikaria this morning. The sun is still strong, but you know that it is not going to last long. Colors of the season started showing themselves on the trees at higher altitudes. It is the best time of the Aegean.»

«The roads gently ascend the hills passing by farms and vineyards. After a few dead ends, I seem to have found my way. In any case, if you get really lost lost, just walk down till you meet the sea, not that hard.»

«As the altitude increased, bushes and olive trees left the scene to pine forest. At the end, I reached my destination point: Theoktistis Monastery. It is really a small monastery this one, but sitting on top of the mountain, the view is well worth the climb. There is a small church at the very entrance with your typical Greek icons and what not. As you climb a bit more though, you come across an-other tiny church which drops your jaw. Imagine that there’s this big rock on the ground, then they built block walls on it, and then using what mythical creature god knows, they placed a gigantic rock on top of it all to serve as a roof. Walking around the church, you realize that the roof bit is ac-tually a massive rock cantilevering out of the mountain. They just built a block wall in between the two rocks. Okay, now it makes sense. It’s a tiny tiny church by the way, the door is barely a meter high or so, you really need to bend down to get in.»

Tolga’s Ikaria : Day 5 – Manganitis

Day 5 – Manganitis : there are no words here, just photos. The words are in the description of the 6th day.

«The south coast of Ikaria is rugged, harsh, so rocky that in most places depriving the trees of the least bit of soil to hang on to. This makes it very difficult for humans to settle, but it is a playground for the goats. These steep hills also shelter some of the most beautiful, tiny, isolated beaches you can find on the island, of which, Seychelles Beach has unequivocal reputation.»

«Here’s another interesting note about Ikaria: After the Greek Civil War of 1946-1949 between the nationalists and the communists, the Greek government used Ikaria as an exile location for the de-feated commies. Some 13,000 people affiliated with the Greek Communist Party, KKE, were sent to the island. Considering the current population of Ikaria is just 8,500, you can well imagine the impact of this relocation on the island’s political demographics. And which party do you think wins all the elections on the island today? Yes, you guessed it right :). Even today, the island is referred to by many Greeks as the Red Rock. It is funny though, Ikarians are also very devout Orthodox Christians. Nowhere else have I seen communism and religion going so much hand in hand, but then again, Ikaria is not just any place.»

«…the highlight of the whole day, perhaps the trip, was the tiny, beautiful, under-stated Manganitis village. With houses overlooking the vast blueness that is the Aegean and the cutest little harbour, this fishing village offers the real isolated Greek island beauty in one’s imagination. And the deli-cious Ikarian ratatouille cooked from vegetables grown by the owner of the taverna himself in his backyard, accompanied by a glass of Mythos… for some people, there is heaven, eden, paradise to go to; for the likes of me, there is Manganitis.»

Tolga’s Ikaria : Day 6 – Departure

Day 6 – Departure: 'The south coast of Ikaria is rugged, harsh, so rocky that in most places depriving the trees of the least bit of soil to hang on to. This makes it very difficult for humans to settle, but it is a playground for the goats. These steep hills also shelter some of the most beautiful, tiny, isolated beaches you can find on the island, of which, Seychelles Beach has unequivocal reputation. Here’s another interesting note about Ikaria: After the Greek Civil War of 1946-1949 between the nationalists and the communists, the Greek government used Ikaria as an exile location for the de-feated commies. Some 13,000 people affiliated with the Greek Communist Party, KKE, were sent to the island. Considering the current population...'

«Today, I will have a few beers and enjoy my book until the Dodekanisos Seaways hydrofoil takes me to Pythagoreio in Samos, from where I will board the boat back to Kusadasi. I have one and a half hours between the two boats, I hope the connection will be less dramatic than the last one.»

«I have to express my gratitude to the amazing island of Ikaria, for treating me like the king that I am and allowing me to reign over it for six long days – much longer than many mighty nations tried to do. It would be unwise though to outstay my welcome, for I know that the spirit of Ikaria is all about freedom. I will surely miss this red little rock of mine and who knows, perhaps one day…»

«Autumn winds increased their strength over Ikaria today. Gone are the long, warm days of the summer. Whether you like it or not, change is on its way. Things are about to get different, and different we will have to embrace.»

.
.

Come again Tolga! Maybe your ancestors and my ancestors were related! Maybe they were friends!
Let’s be friends too! 😊

.
💠 💠 💠
.
.

👩 Eleni

September 20, 2016

.
.


Cross blogging 1: Nana’s WP media


.
We ♥ Nana to agrimi's blog
.Katsika, from 'Four Seasons in Ikaria'

Happy Summer, my friends!


Google Image Search for 'egotoagrimi+files+wordpress'
It’s not the right time of the year to post long accounts. In the summer people usually browse magazines and look at pictures. So this article is about pictures, pictures of a special kind, older or newer attachements to my friend Nana’s blog posts, that may have passed unnoticed. The same as her blog as a whole, these pictures are not touristic neither do they aim to giving information about the island. All I may say about them is that they are thrilling and they have provided inspiration to a lot of viewers, and if I may say, a bit of motivation as well, and that not only concerning Ikaria but for all similar places of the world gifted with an exciting outdoors and a culture of freedom. Before I write a full blog review, I’ll stop and just say: it’s not pictures from my beloved Flickr that I look at when I am homesick for Ikaria. I look at these pictures. And when I have time, I click on the links and I also read the articles some of which go back to several years ago.
I encourage you to take the ride. It’s a wild ride, as wild and natural as our island. Sometimes the concept does not make sense, sometimes it does, sometimes there’s humor or doubt, puzzlement, even bewilderment. There is art and fun and yes, in some of them a visitor can find some tourist information too.
But this is not the point. The point is a strong, desicive and creative girl living and rambling in Ikaria and what she thinks about it all. Take a look yourselves and say if I am wrong.
.

Sending love to NanaSomeone just asked. Yes, of course there will be a second part and maybe more to come. Nana to agrimi’s media library from Ikaria is big!.

Sending love to my readers

.

__

dance-ikaria, from 'Η Ικαριώτικη Σούστα στον καιρό της Παγκοσμιοποίησης.' Konica Minolta Digital Camera 2, from 'Ο Αύγουστος του Αγριμιού'

Faragi mou, from 'OFF THE RECORD #1' blythe-spurge-s, from 'My Blythe Doll is in Ikaria' hornet-1s, from 'THREATS XVII (common)'

October Ikaria, from 'Some Ikaria sounds' xaplara, from 'Time for blackberries' gantia kouzinas, from 'Σαλεμένο Πατατάτο Σώζει Δάση'

The lake we built in Ikaria, from 'Φτιάχνοντας μια Λίμνη στο Φαράγγι (1)' Keep Ikaria free and clean, from 'Η ελεύθερη κατασκήνωση είναι βιώσιμος τουρισμός και πλούτος για όλους' Secret beach, from 'Giving it all : Wild coves & beaches in southern Ikaria'

proespera-1, from 'Spiral Dance Super Version' Agrimi Sum, from 'Agrimi Sum' Old house countryside Ikaria, from 'Rediscover The Countryside'

These Mountains Are For Dancing, from 'Simply ♡ Ikarian' wildcamp3, from 'Mountain Camping Easter' We love Nas, from 'Simply Belgian'

Snake, from 'THREATS Χ – ΑΠΕΙΛΕΣ Χ' OPS Ikarias cleaning Myrsonas trail, from 'Said to be made by God' Ikaria 186, from 'Why can’t we do it in Ikaria?'

Pireus by Vangelis Rinas, from 'Μην κλαίτε! Δεν είναι ξερόβραχος!' Esor Rairb, from 'Not Briar Rose but Esor RairB' misikolaki Ikaria, from 'Το Μισοκωλάκι και άλλες τρομακτικές ιστορίες από την Ικαρία σε κόμικς'

Volunteers trails Ikaria, from 'Εθελοντική εργασία στην Ικαρία' Simply Mother, from 'Simply Mother' OPS Ikarias Google maps, from 'Hiking routes by OPS Ikarias in Google maps'

free in the mountains, from 'I am away for a little while' Savage Nan Ikaria 4, from 'Holes and Thorns' Pot Ikaria, from 'Έλλειψη Συγκέντρωσης'

Birgit&Angelos, from 'Τα σέβη μου σ’εκείνους που επιμένουν' img_5816, from 'ΚΥΚΛΟΣ ΕΡΓΑΣΙΩΝ 1'

free on the other side, from 'Break on through to the other side ☀ yeah !' tourist instructions ikaria august, from 'Ικαρία τον Αύγουστο – Οδηγίες Χρήσης'

frikia sta agka8ia Ikaria, from 'Διάλειμμα για Τζούρες Θυμάρι' love at the pool ikaria, from 'You have the right to remain silent' Ang & Nan, from 'Επιστροφή στον Λαγουδότοπο'

_

et cetera
et cetera

 

♥ ♥ ♥

 

_

__

.

nακεd & unemployed


.

❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀

Hello readers!
Not many words needed for these too few snapshots I was allowed to post wishing to celebrate Nana’s first sureal weeks of her new life in Ikaria. Don’t pay too much importance to the title of the enty. It’s only a joke. 🙂 My best friend is no ordinary girl so the whole thing was a success! ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

.

.

.

Hot Summer Day Dusk Ikaria

.
.

nακεd & unemployed by Nana to agrimi in Flickr

.
.
.
.
Moonlight Ravine Ikaria: A picture by Nana for her radical blog entry: Why can’t we do it in Ikaria?
.
.
.

.

.

.

Trahilas, a secret beach in Ikaria: Picture from Nana's 1st weeks of life in Ikaria

.
.
.
.
.

Whirl Pool Ikaria: Nana's picture from her revealing blog entry: Wild coves & beaches in northern Ikaria

.

Visit her blog to read stories and see photos. And for more quality visit her photostream in (no instagram!) … in Flickr of course!!! ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

code name egotoagrimi

egotoagrimi's old buddy icon in FLickr: Nana in Ikaria with Olianders

.

.

❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀ ❀

.


Αρχαία Ικαρία


.
.Το 'Αρχαία Ικαρία' του Α. Παπαλά στο ikariastore: 'Αν και η Ικαρία δεν είναι μικρό νησί, ο ρόλος της στην ιστορία του Αιγαίου ποτέ δεν ήταν ανάλογος του μεγέθους της. Η ορεινή μορφολογία του εδάφους, η έλλειψη φυσικών λιμένων και το συχνά τρικυμιώδες Ικάριο πέλαγος ήσαν οι τρεις βασικοί παράγοντες που συνετέλεσαν στην απομόνωση του νησιού από τον γεωγραφικό περίγυρό του. Παρ' όλα αυτά δεν έλειψαν περίοδοι που βρέθηκε στην περιφέρεια ή ακόμα και στο κέντρο σημαντικών ιστορικών εξελίξεων. Ο Αντώνης Ι. Παπαλάς είναι καθηγητής της Αρχαίας Ελληνικής και Ρωμαϊκής Ιστορίας και Διευθυντής του Τμήματος Κλασικών Σπουδών στο East Carolina University των Ηνωμένων Πολιτειών. Το βιβλίο αυτό αποτελεί μια...'
«Αν και η Ικαρία δεν είναι μικρό νησί, ο ρόλος της στην ιστορία του Αιγαίου ποτέ δεν ήταν ανάλογος του μεγέθους της. Η ορεινή μορφολογία του εδάφους, η έλλειψη φυσικών λιμένων και το συχνά τρικυμισμένο Ικάριο πέλαγος ήταν οι τρεις βασικοί παράγοντες που συντέλεσαν στην απομόνωση του νησιού από τον γεωγραφικό περίγυρό του. Παρόλα αυτά δεν έλειψαν περίοδοι που βρέθηκε στην περιφέρεια ή ακόμα και στο κέντρο σημαντικών ιστορικών εξελίξεων.»
📖

Έτσι αρχίζει η «Αρχαία Ικαρία», ένα θαυμάσιο βιβλίο για την ιστορία της Ικαρίας από τους προϊστορικούς έως τους μεσαιωνικούς χρόνους που έπεσε πρόσφατα στα χέρια μου. Συγγραφέας είναι ο Ικαριακής καταγωγής Αντώνης Παπαλάς, καθηγητής της Αρχαίας Ρωμαϊκής και Ελληνικής Ιστορίας στο East Carolina University των Ηνωμένων Πολιτειών. Το έργο γράφτηκε στην αγγλική γλώσσα και κυκλοφόρησε στην Αμερική το 1992. Δέκα χρόνια αργότερα μεταφράστηκε και κυκλοφόρησε στην Ελλάδα από τις Εκδόσεις Α.Κ.Καλοκαιρινός. Πρόκειται για μια εξαιρετικά επιμελημένη έκδοση 288 σελίδων με άφθονες κατατοπιστικές φωτογραφίες και παραρτήματα.
Εμπλουτισμένη με πληθώρα ιστορικών πηγών και συσχετισμών η «Αρχαία Ικαρία» είναι πάρα ταύτα γραμμένη σε γλώσσα που διαβάζεται εύκολα και ευχάριστα από το μέσο αναγνώστη. Για τους Σαμιώτες αναγνώστες ιδιαίτερο ενδιαφέρον έχει η περιγραφή των άρρηκτων, διαχρονικών σχέσεων της Ικαρίας με τη Σάμο. Ακόμη, στη σύγχρονη εποχή μας, που κυριαρχεί η ανάγκη για αειφόρο ανάπτυξη και βιωσιμότητα παγκοσμίως αλλά και στο Αιγιακό χώρο ειδικότερα, τα συμπεράσματα που μπορεί να αντλήσει κάνεις μέσα από αυτή τη συγκροτημένη ιστορική διαδρομή της Ικαρίας είναι ιδιαίτερα χρήσιμα και επίκαιρα – θα έλεγα μάλλον πως αποτελούν ένα απροσδόκητα διαφωτιστικό στοιχείο αυτού του βιβλίου.
In my blog, about Rebels and Radicals Το 2005 εκδόθηκε στην Αμερική «η συνέχεια» της Αρχαίας Ικαρίας. Το νέο βιβλίο του Α. Παπαλά που φέρει τον εντυπωσιακό τίτλο “Rebels and Radicals”, πραγματεύεται την ιστορία του νησιού από τη μεταβυζαντινή έως τη σύγχρονη εποχή με ιδιαίτερη έμφαση στα γεγονότα του 1912 (Ικαριακή Επανάσταση), στο «έπος» των Ικαριωτών μεταναστών στην Αμερική και τις περιπέτειες της δραματικής δεκαετίας του 1940 (Αντίσταση, Εμφύλιος, Εξόριστοι).
Όπως και το «Αρχαία Ικαρία», έτσι και το “Rebels and Radicals” σύντομα ελπίζουμε θα μεταφραστεί και θα κυκλοφορήσει και στην Ελλάδα. Οι πρωτότυπες Αγγλικές εκδόσεις τόσο του “Ancient Icaria” όσο και του “Rebels and Radicals” διατίθενται από τον εκδοτικό οίκο Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, Wauconda Illinois και παραγγελίες μπορούν να γίνουν από τις σχετικές ιστοσελίδες. Το «Αρχαία Ικαρία» διατίθεται από τις Εκδόσεις Α.Κ.Καλοκαιρινός, Ράχες Ικαρίας, τηλ. 2275-0-41371 και την ηλεκτρονική διεύθυνση aeikaria@otenet.gr, καθώς και από το ηλεκτρονικό βιβλιοπωλείο του περιοδικού ikariamag.

Αντιγραφη απο το μπλογκ των Ενεργων Πολιτων Σάμου : ΑΡΧΑΙΑ ΙΚΑΡΙΑ

Ιkaria rock side « Φως στη μαύρη τρύπα »

«Καλύπτει ένα κενό στη βιβλιογραφία». Συχνά χρησιμοποιούμε καταχρηστικά αυτή την έκφραση. Όμως για την «Αρχαία Ικαρία» των Εκδόσεων Α.Κ. Καλοκαιρινός – μια ιστορία της από την Εποχή του Χαλκού ώς τα τέλη του 16ου αιώνα – τα λόγια αυτά ηχούν τσιγγούνικα. Αρκεί να συνειδητοποιήσει κανείς ότι γι’ αυτό το άγριο και ιδιότυπο νησί, που μέχρι να αποκτήσει λιμάνια το ‘80, ήταν φοβερά απομονωμένο, σχεδόν δεν υπάρχουν επιστημονικές μελέτες, ούτε έχουν γίνει ποτέ συστηματικές αρχαιολογικές ανασκαφές, παρά μόνο το 1938, ούτε έχει ποτέ προβληθεί η χαρακτηριστική αρχιτεκτονική του. Όλοι τη γνώριζαν ως τόπο εξορίας και ιαματικών λουτρών, όλοι πια ξέρουν για τα εμπορικά καταστήματά της που ανοίγουν τα μεσάνυχτα, αλλά όποτε έψαχνε κανείς για κάτι περισσότερο έπεφτε σε μαύρη τρύπα. Ε! λοιπόν με αυτό το βιβλίο, η τρύπα του… Αιγαίου φωτίζεται. Συγγραφέας του είναι ο Ελληνοαμερικανός καθηγητής Αρχαιοελληνικής Ιστορίας στο Πανεπιστήμιο της Α. Καρολίνας, ο ικαριακής καταγωγής Αντώνης Παπαλάς, ο οποίος δούλεψε με αυστηρή επιστημονική μέθοδο και συνέθεσε το υλικό έτσι ώστε να διαβάζεται άνετα τόσο από τον επιστήμονα όσο και από το ευρύ κοινό. Απολαυστική η περιγραφή της Ικαρίας του 17ου αιώνα από τον τότε Επίσκοπο Ιωσήφ Γεωργειρήνη, που την παρουσιάζει ως το πιο φτωχό αλλά και το πιο ευτυχισμένο νησί του Αιγαίου»

(Μικέλα Χαρτουλάρη, εφημ. ΤΑ ΝΕΑ , 06-07-2002)

Αν θελετε, διαβασετε και το «Ξεναγηση στο Να» στο μπλογκ της Νανας,
που ειναι μια ιστορια που βασιζεται σε αυτο το βιβλιο.

Στο μπλογκ της Νανάς, ΞΕΝΑΓΗΣΗ ΣΤΟ ΝΑ: 'Τι ήταν ο Νας της Ικαρίας τα αρχαία, τα ρωμαϊκά και τα βυζαντινά χρόνια, η θρησκεία, το τοπίο και η ιστορία, η ιστορία του τοπίου.'

Ελενη

😚
.

.
.

Comments

(5 total)

Θεωρώ πολύ επιτυχημένο τον τίτλο. Απ’ ότι έχω καταλάβει, θεωρώ ότι η Ικαρία ήταν «αρχαία» ως τον 20ο αιώνα! 🙂

Sunday August 18, 2009 – 08:46am (EEST)

Το Αγγλικό πρωτότυπο είναι κάπως ξερό αλλά η μετάφραση και η επιμέλεια έχει βελτιώσει πάρα πολύ το ύφος, ενώ οι φωτογραφίες προσθέτουν γλαφυρότητα και επιπλέον στοιχεία. Πολλή ουσία επίσης βρίσκεται και στις παραπομπές και υποσημειώσεις. Η Ικαρία άργησε όμως έβγαλε τελικά ένα πολύ καλό ιστορικό βιβλίο!

Sunday August 24, 2009 – 04:55pm (EST)

Το ίδιο σκεφτόμουν κι εγώ Νανα!
Ευχαριστούμε πολύ, Μαρία!

Monday August 26, 2006 – 10:56pm (EET)

Ξέχασα να πω ότι μου άρεσε πολύ και η μετάφραση της Περιγραφής της Νήσου από τον επίσκοπο Γεωργειρήνη που βρίσκεται στο Παράρτημα. Εξαιρετική δουλειά, καθώς και ο σχολιασμός του μεταφραστή!

Tuesday August 28, 2006 – 12:18pm (EST)

Καποια στιγμη θα γραφω ενα αρθρο στο μπλογκ μου για το συντομο περασμα του Charles Perry απο την Ικαρια το 1738 με αφρρμή την παραγραφο που διαβασα στην εισαγωγη του βιβλιου.

Wednesday September 3, 2009 – 01:09pm (PST)

ΕΥΧΑΡΙΣΤΩ! 🙂
Ευχαριστώ!

Thursday September 25, 2009 – 12:18pm (EST)


ze nnews im mbrief


.
βουλωμενη μυτη

ze nnews im mbrief

-> I have a cold, I have a sore throat, I have a headache, I have dry lips, I have a red nose, I have red eyes and they are running. I have a dribbling mouth. I have a lot of toilet paper and the waste paper basket is by my side. I empty it every 4 hours. The content will be good fertilizer for the garden.

-> I don’t have fever. I don’t have cramps. I don’t have stomachache. I don’t have diarrhoea. I don’t have bird flu.

-> I don’t have malaria. I don’t have two red hot iron bars in my nostrils (I’ve checked it in the mirror).

window 22 Ikaria

ozer mnews im mbrief

-> I can write & I can think too -very hard, slowly and exclusively about my nose, but I can think.

-> I can’t smoke. I can’t have coffee. I can’t eat. I can’t remember what french fries (Ikarian style -my favorite) taste like.

here iz zome mbore mnews

-> I delivered the final draft of something and it was well received.

-> I went out to see a piece of land (a cliff actually). I liked that piece of land.

-> I met the man with the earth mover (bulldozer) who is going to make a road to the land I liked.

He is going to destroy at least half of the beauty of that land (not to mention that the road will be very risky and probably slide down and disappear altogether), however the price of the land will rise because it will be ‘accesible’ then.

bIG nAIL

-> In spite everything I liked that man!?! ^^’ 

These 4 factors combined together undermined and weakened my (overloaded) system, so I caught a virus (as it usually happens with me) and now I’m running on «safety mode» tzzz krk krk bzizk apstchou !…

+ zome goodz mnews

-> today waz ze firzt day of zpring. «Earini Isimeria» = equal day-equal night. Εαρινή Ισημερία.

-> many ozers too, not only me, are ill, the zame az me.

-> I got rid of the idea that I am harming the tourism of Ikaria with my pictures in Flickr.

-> Someone is coming tonight to rub my back with warm alcohol. I will be allowed (and I’ll allow myself) to groan, sigh & moan during the process. I’ll be allowed (and allow myself) to be ill.

more zome other day

iz enybody interezted in reading ze story ov my life?

I feel like writing ze story ov my life rightz now. Or maybe it’z becauze I’m ill.

I’ll thimk amboud it ndomorrow.

kisses

😘 😚

viruses

😜 😝

Eleni

P.S. did you know? I was going to post that photo of the sea here anyway but then as I opened my Ikaria 139blog I saw the last of Jimmy P’s comments. I dedicate this photo to him. No one should deprive anyone of such a view of the sea. It must remain public.

 

.

Comments

(7 total)

Grazie 1000 per la dedica, sono onorato.

Wednesday March 22, 2006 – 01:41am (CET)

Get well soon, El! It’s difficult to read the blog when you type with a stuffy nose  😉

Telling your life story, eh? That sounds like it has a bit more soul-stealing potential than a photograph to me.

Tuesday March 21, 2006 – 10:22pm (EST)

The sea is endless, life is not, that’s what it means.

Tuesday March 21, 2006 – 07:39pm (PST)

μπερασντικά !
Είμαι γκι εγκώ γκρυωμένος γκαι η μπύντη μου είναι μπουλωμμένη.
We look forward for spring and here’s what we get… hahaha

Wednesday March 22, 2006 – 01:04pm (EET)

There is terrific tempest of the equinox blowing right now right here. I won’t go out to take pictures. I’m staying in drinking tsipouro (like ‘grapa’ hey Jimmy?) in warm water with honey. Good medicine… Felicia, my cat, sings me her songs. She is pregnant.

Thursday March 23, 2006 – 03:49am (PST)

iv it heppns agen, edd sam sinnamon barrk & a fiu cloves 2 ze hottt tsipouromelo… «u uil rimembrr mi» 😛

Wednesday May 13, 2009 – 10:03pm (EEST)

copied that 😌 tanx

Wednesday May 13, 2009 – 12:38pm (PDT)